The C-word

cwordThe tag line for this book is “Just your average 28 year old…friends, family, facebook, cancer”.  Not your run of the mill,  ‘personal experience of a disease’ book, this one comes across more in the style of Bridget Jones.

“Carrie Bradshaw fell in Dior, I fell in Debenhams.  It was May 2008, and it was spectacular.  Uncomfortable heels + slippy floor + head turned by a cocktail dress = thwack. Arms stretched overhead, teeth cracking on floor tiles, chest and knees breaking the fall. It was theatrical, exaggerated, a perfect 6.0. And it was Significant Moment #1 in discovering that I had grade-three breast cancer.”  (p. 2)

Lisa Lynch, a journalist and magazine editor, discovered she had breast cancer at 28. One of her ways of dealing with ‘The bullshit’ as she called it, was to write a blog telling it how it really was.  Endorsed by Stephen Fry, the blog turned into a book – The C-Word.

Lisa beat breast cancer, the blog carried on, and there is talk of the BBC turning the book into a film; sadly however, three years later she developed a secondary cancer, and died earlier this year (2013).

The book is a great read whether you have had to deal with cancer in your life or not; for those who have they will surely recognize plenty of moments, for those who haven’t its a realistic eye opener, told in a very funny way.

Lynch, Lisa (2010) The C-word. London: Arrow Books.
ISBN: 9780099547549
Classmark: 362.19699490092 LYN (Health Library)

Titles from Cardiff authors

Over summer the library added several books to its collections that were written, or contributed to, by Cardiff authors, here is a selection:

PlotTarbatt, Jonathan (2012) The plot : designing diversity in the built environment : a manual for architects and urban designers. London: RIBA Publishing.
ISBN: 9781859464434
Classmark: 724.7 PLO (Bute (ARCHI)

Jonathan Tarbatt is a former Cardiff University student who is now a practicing architect.  This books is a professional manual for making more sustainable places.

 

 

BelongingHurdley, Rachel (2013) Home, materiality, memory and belonging : keeping culture. Basingstoke:  Palgrave Macmillan.
ISBN: 9780230230286
Classmark: HM753.H8 (Bute (SOCSI)

Rachel Hurdley is a Research Fellow in the College of Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences whose research focuses on everyday relations between people, things, space and time.

 

 

channelsOviedo-Orta, Ernesto, Kwak, Brenda R. & Evans, W. Howard (2013, eds.) Connexin cell communication channels : roles in the immune system and immunopathology. London: CRC Press.
ISBN: 9781439862575
Classmark: 571.96364 CON (Health)

W. Howard Evans is the Professor of Medical Biochemistry in the Institute of Infection & Immunity, Cardiff University.

 

 

ByzantiTougher, Shaun.  Bearding Byzantium : Masculinity, Eunuchs and the Byzantine Life Course In, Neil, Bronwen & Garland, Lynda (2013, eds.) Questions of gender in Byzantine society. Farnham: Ashgate.
ISBN: 9781409447795
Classmark: HQ1075.5.B97.Q8 (ASSL)

Shaun Tougher is the Senior Lecturer in Ancient History in the School of History, Archaeology and Religion, and the co-director of the Centre for Late Antique Religion and Cutlure at Cardiff.

 

 

lawEgede, Edwin & Sutch, Peter (2013) The politics of international law and international justice. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.
ISBN: 9780748634729
Classmark: JC578.E4 (ASSL)

Edwin Egede is a Senior Lecturer in International Law and International Relations at Cardiff, and Peter Sutch is the Professor of Political and International Theory at Cardiff.

Modernity and reproduction: seductive motorcars, rebellious robots and friendly trees

ModernityWhat does the organization “Men of trees” and the woman who campaigned for birth control, Marie Stopes, have in common?  Perhaps surprisingly the answer is the eugenicist Reginald Ruggles Gate, who was the first husband of Stopes and a member of this tree planting society.   It was this fact that first provided the spark for author Angus McLaren to set off on a journey looking into sexuality and modernity.

Looking at popular literature, films, and public debate from the 1920s and 1930s, alongside the work of biologists and psychiatrists, McLaren discusses the way the mechanistic ideas of modernity were turned to ideas of sexuality and reproduction, and the conversations and discussions that ensued.

“While American science-fiction writers were obsessed with extraterrestrials, rocket ships, and death rays, the British were hypnotized by the possibilities and pitfalls of harnessing biological change.” p. 5 (Introduction)

We are shown how man’s relationship with the environment and ecological issues became intrinsically intertwined with that of eugenics and modernity.

“A large and eccentric cast of characters including seductive motorcars, rebellious robots, friendly trees, and timorous test-tube babies populate this brief study.  Its goal is to better understand why in a remarkably short space of time modernizers (of a variety of stripes) succeeded in advancing the arguments that the protean forces of sex and reproduction had to be subjected to planning and control. They, of course, did not win the debate – it is still going on.” p 6 (Introduction)

McLaren, Angus (2012) Reproduction by design: sex, robots, trees, and test-tube babies in interwar Britain.  Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
ISBN: 9780226560694
Classmark: PR478.F87.M2 (ASSL)